DIARY – ROYAL ASCOT 2018

LADIES DAY – FEATURING THE ASCOT GOLD CUP

THURSDAY 21 JUNE 2018

 

 

 

Frankie Ascot Gold Cup 2018.jpg

The winner of the Ascot Gold Cup

Stradivarius trained by John Gosden and ridden by Frankie Dettori

 

 

This was my first visit to Royal Ascot, although I’d been to 16 previous National Hunt racing fixtures at the Berkshire track.  This particular outing was at the invitation of my employer, due to a number of the original invitees having dropped out.  Royal Ascot takes place over 5 days; Tuesday to Saturday, with 6 races each day.  This year the dates were 19 to 23 June, with the outing having been arranged for Thursday 21 June, 

Ladies Day which is also Gold Cup Day.

The invitation was extended nine days before the event, leaving me with little time to plan my outfit ... although that probably wasn’t a bad thing!  A number of my work colleagues seemed to be continually changing their minds regarding dresses; ordering a number online, then returning all bar the one they’d chosen to wear or even finally deciding that they’d wear one they already owned. 

Anyway, I took a look at dresses on the Bravissimo website; there was a lovely mauve lace dress listed – a ‘Megan’ evidently – but it was £85 and I’d not budgeted for a trip to Royal Ascot this summer.  I thus decided it would have to be a top, skirt and jacket for me; being top heavy, it’s not easy to find dresses in a style I like, hence my research on Bravissimo. 

My favourite colours are shades of purple, turquoise and cobalt.  I found a cobalt top and a cobalt skirt in my cupboard, also a mauve jacket.  I would wear my silver ‘Donna’ shoes by Hotter.  I went out on a reconnaissance trip on Tuesday 12 June, so on Wednesday I was ready to purchase a silver hat/fascinator from M & S, plus a silver ‘lunchbox’ handbag by Faith from Debenhams. 

However, I also saw a nice taupe-coloured handbag by Dune in TK Maxx, so I returned there the following day.  I couldn’t find it to begin with, so was feeling disappointed ... then I looked again, and it transpired that someone had moved it!  I still loved it at second viewing, so had to buy it.  This Ascot malarkey is expensive because you see clothing and accessories you shouldn’t be looking at!!!

And then it got even more expensive; I decided I wanted to new skirt.  M & S just so happened to have a cobalt blue lace midi-length pencil skirt available, for £45.00.  But, they’d also recently issued a number of price reduction vouchers with 10% off the price of skirts – so that reduced it to £40.50.  I ordered it online and collected it from the local store two days before the outing.  I also bought a bright pink sparkly pashmina the day before, also from M & S, just in case I changed my mind regarding my jacket.  So that was my budget completely blown ... especially as there had been no budget in the first place!

I was up at 05:45 on the morning of the races, and left home at 08:10 to drive to Sopwell House Hotel where there would be a coach waiting to take a group of colleagues including me to Ascot.  After reporting to reception and collecting our restaurant badges and tickets, we boarded the coach and set off at 09:30; this was 30 minutes later than expected. 

Initially our journey took us along the narrow Cottonmill Lane, which took quite a while due to the coach having to squeeze past oncoming traffic.  We then headed along Napsbury Lane, before joining the westbound carriageway of the A414.  Having negotiated the Park Street roundabout, we continued along the A405, passing the Noke Hotel en route, in order to join the anticlockwise carriageway of the M25 at junction 21A.   

It came as no surprise that there were delays, due to weight of traffic, upon the London orbital motorway; especially close to the M40 and M4 junctions.  We left the M25 at junction 15 to head along the latter and subsequently headed off that motorway at junction 6, Slough Central.  We continued south on the A332, over the River Thames to reach a roundabout.  Whilst we were waiting in the queue at this point, a colleague pointed out a number of cardboard cut-outs of The Queen and other members of the Royal Family which had been positioned on the balconies of a new development for elderly residents.

Personally, I’d have travelled via the ‘Legoland’ route; but the coach driver headed along the A308 instead, before continuing along the A332 beside Windsor Great Park.  We soon came to a halt, having joined the back of a slow moving queue of traffic; a number of red kites circled nearby ... or perhaps they were vultures! 

Finally, we arrived at the long-about, with the majority of traffic continuing upon the A332.  In contrast, we took the B383, further along turning right into Cheapside Road.  Just beyond the housing, we turned right again, in order to head through the woodland; at one point, we took a shape left turn, to head alongside a lake to our right.  Further on, we skirted around the Ascot United Football Club pitch, and were subsequently directed to park within a field adjacent to the Royal Ascot Golf Club; Car Park 10.

I left my mauve gym bag on the coach when we alighted; it contained a bottle of water, a pair of flatter shoes and my new pashmina.  The lady who had organised the trip had been told that we were just a 10 minute walk from the racecourse entrance.  I think that must have been 10 minutes for me, but not for inexperienced walkers!!!  Anyway, there was plenty of moaning from others, as we headed out of the car park, across the Winkfield Road via the bridge, down the steps beside it, then under said bridge, along the road for a short distance, before turning right to head up beside the Windsor Enclosure, then up a number of steps and into the Queen Anne Enclosure entrance hall.  Whilst in the Winkfield Road, we’d seen a coach and four shuttling smartly dressed punters to the races. 

One of the ladies in our group managed to fall over; others were forced to change their shoes into the flatter pairs they’d brought along with them!  Needless to say, slow walking in heels, even considering my ongoing pelvis issues, didn’t prove a problem for me. 

As it was nearing lunchtime, we headed straight to the Pavilion Restaurant.  There were a number of tables booked, as there had been three coaches taking staff to the racecourse – one from Reading, one from St Pancras and ours from St Albans.  A number of employees had also made their own way to the racecourse, either by car or train; we have branches nationwide.   

I was sat with girls from Liverpool, also one of the Directors, the Financial Director, plus one of the PA’s.  The PA and Director had planned to catch a train from St Albans to St Pancras but plans had gone badly awry because of a six mile signalling failure in the Luton area.  This resulted in no trains running north of St Albans, so only those coming up from the south and terminating at the City Station before returning to the Capital were available. 

As you can imagine, this caused a great deal of anger amongst the commuters; piled on top of the disruptions already caused by extensive timetable changes the previous month.  Due to the lack of trains today, platforms had become dangerously overcrowded and gates were closed to prevent further passengers from entering the area.  Gates were kicked, broken and barriers were scaled in an attempt to reach any train which might become available.  People were soon spilling out onto the pavement and roadway outside the ticket hall. 

Anyway, having been greeted by an insurmountable problem with regards to finding a train to London, the Director and PA found a cab to take them all the way to St Pancras!  The coach was due to depart from the London station at 09:30 and they arrived with moments to spare.  Phew!  In view of the problems, had I been due to travel to Luton on this Thursday, I’d have been caught up in the problems too.  I carry little cash with me on a daily basis, and a debit card very rarely too so, even if I’d walked to the City Centre to catch a bus to Luton I may have been short of the fare!         

Our restaurant table, which I think was no.62, was one of the last in our group to be served.  The waiter/waitresses began to bring the starters out at 11:50.  The starter was Coronation Chicken terrine with golden raisin and caper puree, plus mango salad.

The main course was slow cooked rump of Royal Estate lamb, summer bean and petit pois salad, asparagus, Jersey Royals, and salsa verde.  Dessert was salted caramel custard tart with milk ice cream.

I wasn’t particularly keen on the starter, and thought there was too much lamb and not enough vegetables in the main course.  I didn’t eat all of the lamb; I still feel guilty eating lamb!  Fortunately I loved the dessert.

There would have been afternoon tea too, had I wanted to return to the Restaurant later in the afternoon; sandwiches, buttermilk scones served with Highgrove strawberry preserve and Cornish clotted cream served with tea and infusions.  A shame to have missed it ... but I didn’t want to miss the horses in the Parade Ring and Winners’ Enclosure!

With lunch completed at around 13:30, there was just time for a brief trip to the loo before the PA and I headed to the Parade Ring to see The Queen arrive in her carriage; she arrives at 14:00 each day.  It came as no surprise that the steppings were already packed, but we managed to find a space, facing towards the grandstand, behind the front row at the top thereof and, when she arrived, we did get a brief glimpse.  The Duke of York, the Princess Royal, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie were also in attendance today.  Security personnel, with guns, were stood on top of the towers to the rear of the grandstand – for health and safety reasons they were secured to the building too!

I stayed on the steppings overlooking the Parade Ring ahead of the first race, whilst my colleague wandered off; I think she wanted to go to the Royal Ascot shop.  I love shopping, but watching horses is even better ... and a lot cheaper! 

The favourite for the first race was Vintage Brut, trained by Tim Easterby and ridden by David Allan; price 4-1. 

However, it was the American filly Shang Shang Shang trained by Wesley Ward which made all, under jockey Joel Rosario; she hung on to win by just a nose at the line. The winner was priced at 5-1. The favourite finished a very disappointing 9th.

The result was as follows:

Race 1:

The Norfolk Stakes (Group 2)

[5 furlongs] for 2-year-olds

10 ran

Horse

Trainer

Jockey

1st

Shang Shang Shang

Wesley Ward

Joel Rosario

2nd

Pocket Dynamo

Robert Cowell

Mickael Barzalona

3rd

Land Force

Aidan O’Brien

Ryan Moore

4th

Rumble Inthejungle

Richard Spencer

Tom Queally

My selection:

4th at 9-1

Rumble Inthejungle

Richard Spencer

Tom Queally

 

By the time the winner returned, I’d moved position to be closer to the Parade Ring entry point, although continuing to watch from the far side thereof, for the moment at least.

 

The favourite for the second race was Key Victory, trained by Charlie Appleby and ridden by William Buick; price 7-2.

 

The winner was Hunting Horn for trainer Aidan O’Brien and jockey Ryan Moore; price 5-1.  He took up the running inside the final two furlongs, and stayed on strongly to win by 4½ lengths.  The favourite finished 6th.

 

The result was as follows:

 Race 2:

The Hampton Court Stakes (Group 3)

[1 mile 1 furlong & 212 yards] for 3-year-olds

16 ran

Horse

Trainer

Jockey

1st

Hunting Horn

Aidan O’Brien

Ryan Moore

2nd

Crossed Baton

John Gosden

Robert Havlin

3rd

Zaaki

Sir Michael Stoute

Pat Dobbs

4th

Vintager

David Menuisier

Kieran Shoemark

My selection:

9th at 5-1

Wadilsafa

Owen Burrows

Jim Crowley

 

After the fillies had departed for the racecourse ahead of race 3, I headed around to the area above the Weighing Room, overlooking the Winners’ Enclosure.  Having found a space, I noticed that the lady standing next to me was also wearing the same design of M & S hat, only in navy!

 

The favourite for this race was Wild Illusion, trained by Charlie Appleby and ridden by William Buick; price 9-4.

 

Magic Wand led initially, before Highgarden took up the running a mile from home.  Magic Wand continued to track the leader and led again over two furlongs out; she went clear more than a furlong from the finish and stayed on strongly to win by 4 lengths at the line.

 

Meanwhile the favourite had raced keenly, whilst tracking the leaders.  She took 2nd position two furlongs from home but was soon ridden and was only able to plug on to the line.  

 

The result was as follows:

Race 3:

The Ribblesdale Stakes (Group 2)

[1 mile 3 furlongs & 211 yards] for 3-year-old fillies

10 ran

Horse

Trainer

Jockey

1st

Magic Wand

Aidan O’Brien

Ryan Moore

2nd

Wild Illusion

Charlie Appleby

William Buick

3rd

Sun Maiden

Sir Michael Stoute

James Doyle

4th

Athena

Aidan O’Brien

Donnacha O’Brien

My selection:

5th at 10-1

Perfect Clarity

Clive Cox

Adam Kirby

 

The joint-favourites for the Gold Cup were the 2016 winner and 2017 runner-up Order Of St George, trained by Aidan O’Brien and ridden by Ryan Moore; also Stradivarius, trained by John Gosden and ridden by Frankie Dettori, winner of last year’s Queen’s Vase and Goodwood Cup.  They were priced at 7-4 today.

The pace was steady, with Mount Moriah leading until Torcedor took up the running over 3 furlongs out.  Stradivarius was then ridden to lead over a furlong out, with the French challenger Vazirabad seemingly having every chance in the closing stages too.  However, Frankie’s mount stayed on strongly to assert in the final 100 yards, winning by three quarters of a length at the line.

Order Of St George was disappointing; he was a little reluctant to go the post and, although tracking the leaders, was being pushed along over 4 furlongs out.  However, despite this, he seemed to have every chance until the winner quickened away in the home straight.  Ryan’s mount subsequently hung right and weakened inside the final furlong to finish 4th.

The result was as follows:

Race 4:

The Gold Cup (Group 1) (British Champions Series)

[2 miles 3 furlongs & 210 yards] for 4-year-olds and upwards

9 ran

Horse

Trainer

Jockey

1st

Stradivarius

John Gosden

Frankie Dettori

2nd

Vazirabad

Alain de Royer Dupre

Christophe Soumillon

3rd

Torcedor

Jessica Harrington

Colm O’Donoghue

4th

Order Of St George

Aidan O’Brien

Ryan Moore

My selection: Okay so he was joint-favourite, but he was also a GB runner of course!

1st at 7-4 JF

Stradivarius

John Gosden

Frankie Dettori

 

The favourite for the penultimate race was Crack On Crack On, trained by Clive Cox and ridden by David Probert; price 13-2.

The runners split into three groups; stand-side, middle and with three horses on the far side too.  The nearside group was led by Il Primo Sole, Ostilio led the middle group, and Statuario the far group.  Ostilio subsequently came towards the stands-side, before grabbing the rail position over four furlongs out; despite being ridden over one furlong out, he stayed on strongly to win by 1¼ lengths at the line.

The favourite had been slow into stride and was behind on the stands-side.  He switched towards the centre two furlongs out but, despite staying on, didn’t have to pace to challenge the leaders; he completed in 13th position.

Having styled out the navy blue M & S hat ‘incident’; I now discovered that a new lady was standing next to me, this time wearing exactly the same hat as me, in silver!  That’s the problem with buying a hat from M & S; you’re bound to see others wearing one too.  Fortunately, I didn’t notice anyone wearing the same M & S skirt as me.  

The result was as follows:

Race 5:

The Britannia Stakes (Heritage Handicap)

[1 mile] for 3-year-old colts and geldings

30 ran

Horse

Trainer

Jockey

1st

Ostilio

Simon Crisford

Silvestre De Sousa

2nd

Curiosity

Hugo Palmer

James McDonald

3rd

Magnificent

Richard Hannon

Sean Levey

4th

Desert Wind

Ed Vaughan

Stevie Donohoe

My selection:

11th at 11-1

First Contact

Charlie Appleby

William Buick

 

The favourite for the final race was Communique, trained by Mark Johnston and ridden by Silvestre De Sousa; price 9-2.  There were 18 runners in this one, Dubhe having been withdrawn at the start; six of these 18 represented trainer Mark Johnston!

 

Elegiac led initially, with the favourite taking over the running after two furlongs.  Another Johnston runner, Baileys Excellence, was the next to lead the field, narrowly.  Communique re-took the advantage 4 furlongs out.  Subsequently a fourth Johnston runner, Baghdad, was ridden to lead narrowly inside the final two furlongs, with Corgi laying down a challenge all the way to the line.  In addition, First Eleven met trouble in running but was staying on strongly as the winning line approached.

 

It was a three-way photograph at the post, with Baghdad getting the verdict by a neck over Corgi, and First Eleven a further nose away in third position.

 

The result was as follows:

Race 6:

The King George V Stakes (Handicap)

[1 mile 3 furlongs & 211 yards] for 3-year-olds

18 ran

Horse

Trainer

Jockey

1st

Baghdad

Mark Johnston

Andrea Atzeni

2nd

Corgi

Hughie Morrison

Jim Crowley

3rd

First Eleven

John Gosden

Frankie Dettori

4th

Cross Counter

Charlie Appleby

William Buick

My selection:

11th at 16-1

Cassini

John Gosden

Robert Havlin

 

Knowing that I had to report to the coach at 18:00, I waited until the winner had arrived back in the Winners’ Enclosure but departed before the mementos were presented.  Unfortunately many spectators had also decided it was now time to leave, so I was stuck for a few minutes, gridlocked on the concourse.  Eventually this cleared a little and I was able to head across to the steps which led down into the Queen Anne Enclosure.  Mind you, one bloke bumped into me and nearly knocked me off my feet, although he did apologise. 

I made my way down through the crowded enclosure, past the bandstand where race-goers were gathering for the post-race ‘sing-song’; I was heading for the entrance/exit hall.  There was a long queue for the ladies loo therein; fortunately I was okay and decided I could last home!  I recognised three ladies from our group, but decided not to accompany them, as they wouldn’t be able to walk as fast as me!   Besides, one had suffered a recent fracture to an ankle; this was now encased in a fracture boot!    

Apart from my feet feeling a little numb, due to standing still for the majority of the afternoon, I felt fit enough to overtake numerous people as I headed down the concourse towards the road.  At one point, two mounted police officers headed towards us; they were needed to act as ‘out-riders’ for an ambulance as it weaved its way to the highway.

Once I’d reached the Winkfield Road, I turned left to head through the underpass.  There were two options further ahead; I could either climb the steps in order to retrace my inbound route, or continue along the road to where a steward was controlling a crossing point.  I chose the latter, because I didn’t have the patience to follow the slow-moving group of people as they headed up the paved steps!

However, upon reaching the crossing point, we were forced to wait for a break in the traffic before we were permitted to walk across the road.  Whilst waiting, I recognised two members of senior personnel who passed by on the opposing pavement; but they’d disappeared by the time I got across to the other side.  

Although I’m usually very good at directions, I wasn’t 100% sure where the coach was parked. So, having gone slightly ‘off piste’ within the first field I encountered, I then headed into a second field to be greeted by numerous coaches lined up each side of a central corridor.  I decided to wait until I saw further people that I knew; it was the Liverpool girls who turned up first. 

We almost walked past our coach, before realising it was the one we needed!  It did have our company name written on a sticker attached to the front windscreen, but the writing was small and difficult to read.  The coach company’s name was emblazoned on the side of the vehicle, but that wasn’t clearly visible due to the proximity of coaches either side!  Anyway, we were the first people to arrive back, and I decided to sit on the off-side this time, second row.  I was latterly joined by the Scottish area manager. 

With everyone due aboard the coach accounted for, it left at 18:30.  All three coaches would be returning to the Sopwell House Hotel, allowing many of the attendees to stay overnight before departing for home the next morning.  I had been offered the opportunity to stay, but couldn’t find enough of a reason to do so because I lived not far from the hotel and wouldn’t be handicapped by alcohol intake either! 

Although we’d earlier been told that our exit route would be far more direct, our driver followed the signage and we ended up returning via our inbound route after all.  The straight mile was being watered by a sprinkler as we drove by.  Having re-entered the woods, we encountered a couple of vehicles heading in the opposite direction; small coaches I think.  They were a squeeze to get by!

We continued along the causeway beside the lake once more, before reaching a T-junction where we turned left.  There was another delay within the village of Cheapside, where we had to squeeze around parked cars against a line of oncoming traffic.  This was followed by a further delay at the next T-junction, because traffic upon the B383 seemed reluctant to let us out onto the main thoroughfare; it had to halt in both directions to enable us to manoeuvre out.

A little further on was a set of temporary traffic lights and we were held at these whilst other coaches exited from a side-road on our left.  We then continued on to the long-about; another delay was encountered whilst we waited in a queue to enter the traffic island.

Finally we were in the clear and heading back up the A332 towards Windsor.  However, we encountered yet another tailback whilst travelling along beside Windsor Great Park.  This was caused by an ambulance parked on our carriageway; it transpired that a cyclist had been knocked off their bike, as a rear-dented car was also parked nearby.  The injured cyclist’s friend was waiting near the emergency vehicle, presumably having called for the ambulance.

Having cleared this unfortunate obstruction, we continued along the A332 to reach the outskirts of Windsor.  We subsequently headed along the A308 which, for part of the journey, took us around a one-way system.  After negotiating another roundabout, we continued along the Windsor bypass before arriving at junction 6 of the M4.  We then headed along the eastbound carriageway to reach the M25.  Having entered the London orbital motorway, we encountered slow moving traffic on the initial stretch, despite it now being early evening.   

We continued upon the motorway, with the driver deciding that it would be better to leave at Junction 22, rather than at 21A where we’d joined it earlier in the day.  We continued up the dual carriageway to the London Colney roundabout.  Our coach waited for the traffic lights to change to green, after which our driver managed to ‘cut-up’ a car to our right by encroaching into its lane!  Oops!  The car driver wasn’t happy and sounded his or her horn!

We subsequently continued along the dual carriageway, before turning off at a slip-road in order to join Napsbury Lane.  We headed back over a bridge across the dual carriageway, followed by a bridge over the Bedford to St Pancras Thameslink railway line; retracing our steps towards the Sopwell House Hotel. 

The initial section of Cottonmill Lane was clear but, as we rounded the corner adjacent to the old lodge, we encountered a number of vehicles heading in the opposite direction.  The first vehicle managed to squeeze by, but not before the driver of the left-hand drive vehicle had manually pushed in his right-hand wing mirror. And there was worse to come, as the lady driver of the second vehicle was almost overcome with tears as she tried to cope with manoeuvring her car past our coach. 

Finally we were clear of the obstructions. However it was decided that, instead of backing into the driveway at the Hotel as had been the case in the morning, the driver would park outside so that everyone could alight and walk the short distance along the driveway.  He’d then turn around within the car park of the Mill opposite, before returning back from whence he came.  The mill itself had been converted into office space many years ago. 

I, meanwhile, headed off to collect my car from the far end of the car park, behind the main hotel building.  I waved to a group of colleagues as I drove out, heading for home.  In fact I followed the coach along Cottonmill Lane, at a distance, and arrived home at 20:20. 

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With a final flourish, Aiden O’Brien was crowned Champion Trainer at this year’s Royal Ascot; having trained 4 winners, he won on count-back over John Gosden and Sir Michael Stoute who also trained four winners apiece.  Ryan Moore claimed the Champion Jockey prize, with 5 winners, over Frankie Dettori’s 4 winners.

There are 30 races at Royal Ascot, with the most successful sire this year being Frankel. His sire Galileo (Saddlers Wells/Urban Sea) had 2 winners, as did Galileo’s half-brother Sea The Stars (Cape Cross/Urban Sea).  Camelot (Montjeu) also had 2 winners, along with Mastercraftsman (Danehill Dancer) and Shamardal (Giant’s Causeway).  Both Frankel and Galileo also sired two runner-ups each. 

*   *   *   *   *   *   *

A nasty incident occurred at Ascot this day when the horses pulling the private hire carriage, which was transporting race-goers away from the course at the time, were spooked and subsequently crashed through a shop window.  Fortunately no-one was hurt and, contrary to reports, the horses were okay although one was battered and bruised and needed stitches too:

http://www.horseandhound.co.uk/news/praise-authorities-brave-carriage-horse-ascot-accident-657236

*   *   *   *   *   *   *

Click here for Photos

 

 

 

STATISTICS

Sire

Winner

Race

Distance

Age

 

Acclamation (UK)

Expert Eye

Jersey Stakes (Group 3)

7 furlongs

3-year-old

 

Camacho (UK)

Signora Cabello

Queen Mary Stakes (Group 2)

5 furlongs

2-year-old fillies

Camelot (UK)

Hunting Horn

Hampton Court Stakes (Group 3)

1 mile 2 furlongs approx

3-year-old

 

Camelot (UK)

Arthur Kitt

Chesham Stakes (Listed)

7 furlongs

2-year-old

 

Delegator (UK)

Accidental Agent

Queen Anne Stakes (Group 1)

1 mile

4-year-old plus

 

Dubawi (IRE)

Old Persian

King Edward VII Stakes (Group 2)

1 mile 4 furlongs approx

3-year-old

 

Fastnet Rock (AUS)

Merchant Navy

Diamond Jubilee Stakes (Group 1)

6 furlongs

4-year-old plus

 

Footstepsinthesand (UK)

Lagostovegas

Ascot Stakes (Handicap)

2 miles 4 furlongs approx

4-year-old plus

 

Frankel (UK)

Baghdad

King George V Stakes (Handicap)

1 mile 4 furlongs approx

3-year-old

 

Frankel (UK)

Without Parole

St James’ Palace Stakes (Group 1)

1 mile approx

3-year-old

 

Frankel (UK)

Monarchs Glen

Wolferton Stakes (Listed)

1 mile 2 furlongs approx

4-year-old plus

Galileo (IRE)

Magic Wand

Ribbledale Stakes (Group 2)

1 mile 4 furlongs approx

3-year-old fillies

 

Galileo (IRE)

Kew Gardens

Queen’s Vase (Group 2)

1 mile 6 furlongs approx

3-year-old

 

Invincible Spirit (IRE)

Eqtidaar

Commonwealth Cup (Group 1)

6 furlongs

3-year-old

 

Kheleyf (USA)

Bacchus

Wokingham Stakes (Heritage Handicap)

6 furlongs

3-year-old plus

 

Kingman (UK)

Calyx

Coventry Stakes (Group 2)

6 furlongs

2-year-old

 

Mastercraftsman (IRE)

Alpha Centauri

Coronation Stakes (Group 1)

1 mile approx

3-year-old fillies

 

Mastercraftsman (IRE)

Agrotera

Sandringham Stakes (Handicap)

1 mile

3-year-old fillies

 

Motivator (UK)

Pallasator

Queen Alexander Stakes (Conditions Race)

2 miles 6 furlongs approx

4-year-old plus

 

New Approach (IRE)

Ostilio

Britannia Stakes (Heritage Handicap)

1 mile

3-year-old colts & geldings

 

Poet’s Voice (UK)

Poet’s Word

Prince of Wales’ Stakes (Group 1)

1 mile 2 furlongs approx

4-year-old plus

 

Rio de la Plata (USA)

Settle For Bay

Royal Hunt Cup (Heritage Handicap)

1 mile

3-year-old plus

Sea The Stars (IRE)

Stradivarius

Gold Cup (Group 1)

2 miles 4 furlongs approx

4-year-old plus

 

Sea The Stars (IRE)

Crystal Ocean

Hardwicke Stakes (Group 2)

1 mile 4 furlongs approx

4-year-old plus

 

Shamardal (USA)

Blue Point

King’s Stand Stakes (Group 1)

5 furlongs

3-year-old plus

 

Shamardal (USA)

Aljazzi

Duke of Cambridge Stakes (Group 2)

1 mile

4-year-old plus fillies/mares

Shanghai Bobby (USA)

Shang Shang Shang

Norfolk Stakes (Group 2)

5 furlongs

2-year-old

 

Showcasing (UK)

Soldier’s Call

Windsor Castle Stakes (Listed)

5 furlongs

2-year-old

 

Teofilo (IRE)

Dash Of Spice

Duke of Edinburgh Stakes (Handicap)

1 mile 4 furlongs approx

3-year-old plus

 

Zoffany (IRE)

Main Edition

Albany Stakes (Group 3)

6 furlongs

2-year-old

 

 

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