DIARY – AINTREE

SATURDAY 14 APRIL 2012

GRAND NATIONAL DAY – PART I

 

 

parade of legends for diary.jpg

 

The Parade of Legends:

11 Previous Grand National winners,

led by the 29-year-old Miinnehoma

 

 

My alarm sounded at 06:00 after a fairly restful sleep; I can only remember waking once during the night.  I lay in bed for a further 10 minutes before taking a shower.  That was the one thing that my Travelodge room had which was of a higher standard than Premier Inn; the latter having power showers but they are located over a bath, whereas this was a standalone shower with no bath.  I actually confess to being a bath person, rather than a shower person but, if I’m going out for the day, it’s a lot quicker to have a shower and wash one’s hair at the same time. 

 

Breakfast today was the two remaining hot cross buns.  I drank a mug of tea and a mug of black coffee too, and was hoping to watch the BBC morning news programme ... however this had been replaced by the practice session for a Grand Prix; what a waste of broadcasting time that is.  I watched Sky News instead, until Channel 4’s Morning Line began at 07:55.  Having dried my hair and applied my make-up, I was ready to set off as soon as the TV programme had ended.    

 

My outfit today was a cream coloured long-sleeved thermal vest, a bright pink camisole, bright pink BHS top, cerise pink cardigan, neon blue fleece, grey BHS skirt, blue Per Una jacket, purple winter coat and flowered scarf from River Island.  I hadn’t expected to resemble Michelin woman during April, especially after the very hot day at Newbury the previous month when my decollette had become burnt in the spring sunshine!  

 

Having packed my bags and locked the hotel room, I set off to find my way out of the hotel.  The doors were no easier to negotiate than they’d been the previous evening.  There was no-one at the reception desk, so I posted the room key through a slot in the counter top before leaving the Travelodge.  Having packed everything in boot of my car, I was ready to set off for Aintree.  It was 08:55. 

 

The trip along the A580 went smoothly; Merseyside appear to prefer traffic light controlled junctions rather than roundabouts, and the phasing is very slow as compared to my home city.  Perhaps it is the pace of life in the south-east, where everyone seems in such a hurry.  I then headed northwards up the M57, taking a sharp left to drive down the Ormskirk Road, past the Asda supermarket, under a railway bridge, then left at the next set of traffic lights.  The road, Aintree Lane, bears around to the right and, having negotiated a number of traffic calming humps, I arrived at the Anchor Bridge entrance.  It was 09:20.

 

However, upon showing the security staff my ticket and parking badge, I was told that the fee paying public would not be allowed to enter the confines of the racecourse until 09:45; only members of staff were being permitted in.  This was due to problems they had already encountered with animal welfare protestors.  A member of the security staff moved a line of traffic cones and directed me back onto Aintree Lane, having told me to go and park somewhere until opening time.  So much for the instructions given to the public to arrive early!!!

 

I drove back along Aintree Lane, entering one of the residential roads on the right-hand side, before turning around and parking close to the junction with the aforementioned thoroughfare.  Whilst I was waiting, I decided to change one of my disposable contact lenses; it had been a little uncomfortable since I’d inserted it in my eye earlier in the morning.  At just gone 09:45 I started my car and drove back to Anchor Bridge.  There was now a queue of considerable length, vehicles tailing back beyond the mid-road hatching to block the road. 

 

After a few minutes wait, and with my ticket and parking badge checked, I drove over the Bridge and across the Grand National racecourse to reach the roadway leading to the Steeplechase car park.  As there were more vehicles queuing than yesterday, I was waved through the security checks.  Having arrived later today, I was parked further back in the car park too.  Hoping to walk the National course today, having put on my jacket and coat, I didn’t change my shoes, but wore my flat mocassins which I use for driving.  I buckled my navy T-bar shoes around the handle of my capacious handbag before heading for the entrance.  I handed in the voucher which had been attached to my ticket to someone in the kiosk to obtain a race-card.  

 

My ticket was scanned ... or rather it wasn’t ... it also belonged to a faulty batch like yesterday’s ticket; the barcode being unreadable by the scanner.  Having shown my enclosure badge, I was issued with another ticket.  My bag was searched, the security guard remarking upon the huge bag of Fruitellas which was placed within.  Well, I needed something to keep me going through the day!  My body was then scanned for dangerous possessions before I was permitted to walk across the Melling Road to catch a bus to the grandstand side of the racecourse.

 

Having alighted from the bus, I crossed the home straight upon the green carpet to reach the betting ring, before walking to the Parade Ring.  I purchased a copy of the Racing Post, interested to see how many rides Choc would have at Chepstow that day – 7, although one would be a non-runner.  My next task was to place my bets on the Grand National via the Tote.  Having listen to The Morning Line I’d chosen 6 horses ... in hindsight rather too many to get my money back each way at the starting prices.  They were West End Rocker, Seabass, According To Pete, Organised Confusion, Ballabriggs and Cappa Bleu.

 

With time to kill until proceedings began, it was now time for me to walk the Grand National course; I’d walked it on my first visit to Aintree in 2009, but not since.  On that occasion, my friend Lesley had resisted the temptation to accompany me.  I suppose the difference between us is that I love walking, she does not!  The course walk is signposted, so I had to return to the crossing point, before heading along the pathway beside the roadway used by the buses.  I often think that I might stroll along to the winning post to see Red Rum’s grave, but I haven’t done so yet.

 

The route then crosses the track close to the Melling Road, and onwards through the entrance to the Steeplechase enclosure.  I then walked along the pathway or, where blocked, the embankment, bookmaker pitches and refreshment/food stalls located beside the rails.  There is a gateway situated between the first and second Grand National fences, so I crossed the course upon a green carpet; tripping once if I recall, despite my sensible shoes.  Once inside the ‘centre field’  I turned right to walk along the roadway past fence two and onwards to Becher’s Brook.  I continued around the circuit, taking photographs as I went. 

 

Upon reaching the final fence beside the canal, only badgeholders are permitted to proceed across the Melling Road and around to the Chair.  My return route took me to the nearside of the golf club range, coaches parked all along the side of the road.  A pathway then to my left, beside the heliport; a helicopter approaching over the top of me to land in the area beyond.  At the end of this pathway, I turned right and headed back to the course crossing point.  Having crossed the racecourse, I once more negotiated the betting pitches within the Steeplechase enclosure and headed out of the entrance to recross the track.  The Band of the Duke of Lancaster’s Regiment were heading towards me as I crossed back over the racecourse; fortunately, although marching, they didn’t move as fast as I did!

 

Having walked along the signed route back to the home straight, I crossed the course via the green carpet and on this occasion returned to the terrace in front of the Earl of Derby stand.  Having worn my flat driving shoes to walk the course, I then changed into the T-bar navy blue ones which I had earlier buckled to the strap of my handbag. 

 

With Choc not being in action today, there was no need for me to spend time moving between the Parade Ring, the Earl of Derby Enclosure and the Winners’ Enclosure.  I would spend the majority of my time on the Terrace as I’d done on Grand National Day in 2010. 

 

As I stood leaning against one of the barriers, the bright sunshine of earlier in the morning now gave way to clouds.  I moved to the top step of the terrace hoping it would afford more shelter.  However, due to the prevailing wind direction today, I did get a little damp when there was a brief shower shortly afterwards.  Although fortunately, in addition to my winter coat, I did have my purple umbrella with me too.    

 

The first item on today’s agenda was the Parade of Champions, taking place in the Parade Ring at 11:45; I was able to view this on the large screen positioned immediately across the racecourse from where I was standing. 

 

Eleven previous Grand National winners paraded today.  The oldest surviving winner was Miinnehoma (1994), now 29 years of age.  The others parading were Rough Quest (1996); Lord Gyllene (1997); Red Marauder (2001); Bindaree (2002); Amberleigh House (2004); Hedgehunter (2005); Numbersixvalverde (2006); Silver Birch (2007); Comply Or Die (2008); and Don’t Push It (2010).  Both Papillon (2000) and Monty’s Pass (2003) were still alive and enjoying retirement in Ireland but were unable to make it to Aintree today.  Both Mon Mome (2009) and Ballabriggs (2011) would be competing in this year’s race.

Following the Parade, a number of Grand National Legends were inducted into the ‘Hall of Fame’.  This year the inductees were:

Fred Winter is the only man to have ridden (Sundew 1957 & Kilmore 1962) and trained (Jay Trump 1965 & Anglo 1966) two Grand National winners.  He was Champion jockey four times during the 1950s and leading trainer seven times during the 1970s.

Carl Llewellyn won the Grand National twice, aboard Party Politics in 1992 and in 1998 aboard Earth Summit.  During his riding career he rode 995 winners, including 5 at the Cheltenham Festival including the Mildmay of Flete and the Triumph Hurdle.  He also trained and rode Run For Paddy to win the Scottish Grand National.  Carl currently works as Assistant Trainer to Nigel Twiston-Davies.  At the time of writing, Earth Summit is the only horse to have won the Grand National, the Scottish National and the Welsh National.   

Fred Rimell is one of the greatest Grand National trainers, winning the race 4 times with different horses – ESB (1956), Nicolaus Silver (1961), Gay Trip (1970) and Rag Trade (1976).  He also had a highly successful career as a jockey, winning the Champion title four times between 1939 and 1946. 

Michael Scudamore rode in 16 consecutive Grand Nationals, starting in 1951.  He won the race in 1959 aboard Oxo.  Son Peter and grandson Tom have maintained the family association with the great race.  His other grandson, Michael, took over his grandfather’s training licence in 2008.

Tommy Carberry rode L’Escargot to victory in 1975, beating Red Rum; the horse completing a remarkable double having already won the Cheltenham Gold Cup in 1970 and 1971.  In 1999 he became a member of the elite group who have successfully ridden and trained a Grand National winner when his son, Paul, rode Bobbyjo to victory. 

Tommy Pickernell rode in the race 17 times between 1859 to 1877; winning 3 on Anatis, The Lamb and Pathfinder.  His record of 17 rides is only bettered by Tom Olliver who was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 2011.

Battleship and Bruce Hobbs – Battleship won the American Grand National in 1934 before being shipped to England.  After lengthy treatment for an injured tendon he won the 1938 Grand National as a 40-1 outsider.  The horse may have been the smallest horse to win the race, standing at 15.2 hands and was also the last stallion to win the race.  Bruce Hobbs, the son of the trainer, was the youngest ever winning jockey at 17 years and 3 months.

George Dockeray trained Lottery to win the first Grand National winner in 1839; following that he trained 3 more winners in the next 13 years – Jerry, Gaylad and Miss Mowbray.  Alongside Ginger McCain and Fred Rimell he is one of only three trainers with 4 victories in the race.

The next event was the Aintree Legends Charity Race, organised in aid of The Bob Champion Cancer Trust.  Twelve ex-jockeys were competing in this flat race, over a distance of one mile and five furlongs; all jockeys carrying 12 stone.  The figureheads for the event were Bob Champion himself, dressed in the Aldiniti silks and Jonjo O’Neill, who had also battled and overcome cancer, the latter wearing the JP McManus silks. 

Bob and Jonjo led the jockeys down the steps from the Weighing Room and into the Winners’ Enclosure for a photo-call. 

The twelve competitors were:

Marcus Armytage (1990 – Mr Frisk) riding Cape Express; Jim Culloty (2002 – Bindaree) riding Pillar Of Hercules; Hywel Davies (1985 - Last Suspect) riding Satou; Ben De Haan (1983 - Corbiere) riding Fidelis; Tony Dobbin (1997 – Lord Gyllene) riding Waldvogel; Jimmy Frost (1989 - Little Polveir) riding Sky Calling; Mick Kinane (13 time Irish Champion jockey) riding American Trilogy; Carl Llewellyn (1992 – Party Politics; 1998 – Earth Summit) riding Just Lille; Adrian Maguire (winner of over 1024 races in the UK) riding Arabian Heights; Richard Pitman (rider of 470 winners, and broadcaster) riding Millers Reef; Brendan Powell (1988 – Rhyme ‘N’ Reason) riding May Contain Nuts; Graham Thorner (1972 - Well To Do) riding Private Story.  Unfortunately ex-flat jockey and now trainer, Pat Eddery, was unable to take part as hoped, his mount being a non-runner; Graham Thorner having stepped in as the substitute competitor.

Richard Pitman must receive special mention, as he recently donated a kidney to an anonymous transplant patient.  He was competing in this charity race despite the reservations of his doctor!

Bob and Jonjo, mounted aboard horses, led the runners out of the Parade Ring and onto the racecourse.  They waited for the competitors to canter to the start before also doing the same.  Shortly before the race they cantered back down the course to enter the enclosure in front of the Earl of Derby/Lord Sefton stands, where they remained until after the race.

The start of this race was located just to the far side of the second flight of hurdles in the home straight.  Four of the horses were greys, two light greys – Satou and American Trilogy, one dapple grey – Fidelis and one iron grey – Arabian Heights. 

Result

Horse

Jockey

Trainer

1st

American Trilogy

Mick Kinane

Paul Nicholls

2nd

Waldvogel

Tony Dobbin

Nicky Richards

3rd

Cape Express

Marcus Armytage

Nicky Henderson

4th

Sky Calling

Jimmy Frost

Martin Keighley

 

Then they were off.  The runners were led away by Hywel Davies aboard Satou, from Brendan Powell Senior on May Contain Nuts.  These were followed by Just Lille and Carl Llewellyn, Private Story and Graham Thorner, American Trilogy and Mick Kinane, the Martin Keighley trained Sky Calling and Jimmy Frost, Waldvogel and Tony Dobbin, Fidelis and Ben De Haan, Cape Express and Marcus Armytage, Millers Reef and Richard Pitman, Pillar Of Hercules and Jim Culloty; bringing up the rear was the Alan King trained Arabian Heights, jockey Adrian Maguire sporting the maroon, blue and white colours of the McNeill Family.

 

Satou continued to cut out the running along with May Contain Nuts as the horses headed down the back straight; Arabian Heights still in rear.  Just Lille came to dispute the lead with Satou as May Contain Nuts began to drift backwards on the outside of the field.  Millers Reef was now last. 

 

Just Lille led the field into the home straight from Sky Calling and American Trilogy.  As Carl Llewellyn’s mount gave way, Sky Calling and American Trilogy went on; the latter asserting as the field passed the wing of the final flight and going on to win the race by 9 lengths.  Waldvogel ran on well to take 2nd; Marcus Armytage completed in 3rd aboard Cape Express; Sky Calling held on to 4th.

 

Arabian Heights and Adrian Maguire completed in 6th.  Richard Pitman beat two home; Graham Thorner and Brendan Powell Senior (Senior, as his son Brendan Powell Junior rides as a Conditional Jockey at the present time). 

 

Bob and Jonjo, having waited in the enclosure in front of the Earl of Derby/Lord Sefton stands whilst the race was taking place, were on hand to ride in ahead of the winning horse and jockey as they proceeded down the horse walkway in front of the stands before returning to the Winners’ Enclosure.

Following the Charity Race, there was a second Parade of Champions, this time the eleven horses paraded on course in front of the grandstands.  

Being Merseyside, and the FA Cup Semi-Final taking place between Everton and Liverpool at Wembley today; each time one of the teams scored, the news was displayed on the large screens; a cheer being heard from the relevant supporters.  For the record, Liverpool beat Everton; I guess that must have pleased Choc, as Liverpool is his favourite football team.

It was soon time for the first ‘proper’ race of the day, off time 13:45.  The race featured this year’s Cheltenham Festival Neptune Investment Management Novices’ Hurdle winner, Simonsig.  

The starting gate for this race was located mid way down the back straight, with two flights to negotiate before the far turn. 

Race 1

Mersey Novices’ Hurdle (Grade 2)

Distance

2 miles 4 furlongs (11 flights to negotiate)

No. of Runners

10

 

Then they were off; first time.  The field was led away by the Jason Maguire ridden Super Duty; Colour Squadron held up in rear.  Heading towards the end of the back straight, the order was Super Duty, Go All The Way, Maggio, Old Tricks, Aland Islands, Simonsig, Baby Shine, Molotof and Flycorn; at the back of the field was Colour Squadron. 

 

Turning into the home straight on the first occasion, Simonsig was not fluent at the third flight.  Super Duty continued to lead from Go All the Way and Maggio; Old Tricks, in fourth, was untidy at the fifth flight and soon lost his place.  Simonsig had made progress and was now in third position.  Having been held up in rear, Colour Squadron took closer order too and was in mid-field by the end of the back straight.

 

Super Duty led around the far turn, Go All the Way soon pushed along and dropping back through the field.  Turning into the home straight, Jason Maguire’s mount still held the advantage from Simonsig, Baby Shine and Colour Squadron; however, the latter fell 3 out.

 

Simonsig came to challenge 2 out.  Super Duty hit this flight, his nose touched the ground and he nearly unseated his rider.  This left Barry Geraghty’s mount to clear the final flight and coast home by 15 lengths.  Super Duty held onto 2nd spot, with Baby Shine 3rd and Flycorn 4th.

 

Richard Johnson’s leg had been trapped momentarily under the horse’s body when Colour Squadron fell.  But the horse soon rose to his feet unscathed and his jockey led him back.

 

Result

Horse

Jockey

Trainer

1st

Simonsig

Barry Geraghty

Nicky Henderson

2nd

Super Duty

Jason Maguire

Donald McCain Jnr

3rd

Baby Shine

Leighton Aspell

Lucy Wadham

4th

Flycorn

Paul Townend

T Hogan

 

I remained in my vantage point on the top step of the Earl of Derby Terrace.

 

Soon it was time for the next race, the Grade 1 Novices’ Chase; featuring star novice chaser Sprinter Sacre, winner of this season’s Arkle Challenge Trophy Chase. 

 

The excitable Australia Day went down early to the start.  It was the bay/brown horse versus the greys.  Kudu Country is a very dark iron grey with white tip to his tail; both Toubab and Australia Day are dapple greys, the latter slightly lighter.  Toubab is a very pretty dapple grey who would not be out of place as a rocking horse! 

 

The starting gate for this race was in the far corner of the track; the cross fence being the first obstacle.

 

Race 2

Maghull Novices’ Chase (Grade 1)

Distance

2 miles (12 fences to negotiate)

No. of Runners

4

 

Then they were off; first time.  The field was led away by Australia Day, from Kudu Country, Sprinter Sacre and Toubab.  The former jumped violently right over the first fence; he went so wide that he almost collided with the single black and white hurdle which denoted the boundary between the chase and hurdles tracks!

 

Australia Day went right again clearing the second obstacle; Sprinter Sacre now tracking the leader, Barry Geraghty restraining his exuberant mount as the runners headed down the home straight on the first occasion.  Around the grandstand turn and out into the country, the order was Australia Day, Sprinter Sacre, Toubab and Kudu Country.

 

Denis O’Regan’s mount continued to give away ground by jumping out to his right.  Toubab hit the 5th fence.  Sprinter Sacre took the lead jumping the 6th fence, where Kudu Country made a mistake.  As Australia Day began to back-pedal, Toubab went into 2nd position after the next obstacle.  Kudu Country hit the final fence in the back straight but was soon a remote third, relegating Australia Day to last.

 

Around the top turn Barry Geraghty took a look under his left arm to ascertain if there were to be any challengers.  Only Toubab was within striking distance, although five lengths back.  Sprinter Sacre was still on the bridle; Ruby’s mount 3 lengths down and attempting to launch a challenge when he hit the open-ditch, 2 out.  As a result of the error, Toubab was now well beaten. 

 

Barry Geraghty’s mount flew the last, ears pricked, and went on to win by 13 lengths from Toubab.  Kudu Country finished 36 lengths away in 3rd, Australia Day 7 lengths back in 4th.

 

Result

Horse

Jockey

Trainer

1st

Sprinter Sacre

Barry Geraghty

Nicky Henderson

2nd

Toubab

Ruby Walsh

Paul Nicholls

3rd

Kudu Country

James Reveley

Tom Tate

4th

Australia Day

Denis O’Regan

Paul Webber

 

I remained in my vantage point on the top step of the Earl of Derby Terrace.

 

The next race featured this year’s Champion Hurdler Rock On Ruby and last year’s Triumph Hurdle winner Zarkandar.  Also Oscar Whisky who finished 3rd in last year’s Champion Hurdle and who won this event last year.   

The starting gate for this race was located mid way down the back straight, with two flights to negotiate before the far turn. 

Race 3

Aintree Hurdle (Grade 1)

Distance

2 miles 4 furlongs (11 flights to negotiate)

No. of Runners

5

 

Then they were off; first time.  The field was led away by Rock On Ruby, from Zarkandar, Oscar Whisky, Thousand Stars and Third Intention.  Barry Geraghty’s mount pulled his way into second position over the second flight, now with Zarkandar, Thousand Stars and Third Intention in his slipstream; the grey not fluent here.

 

Rock On Ruby’s ears were pricked as the runners entered the home straight on the first occasion.  Noel Fehily’s mount continued to lead as the runners galloped past the grandstands, from Oscar Whisky, Thousand Stars, Zarkandar and outsider Third Intention.

 

No change at the head of affairs heading out into the country once more.  However, Zarkandar dived at the next flight, somersaulting over, his hindquarters landing on his jockey’s head and dislodging his helmet.  The horse was fine, trotting away.  Ruby Walsh sat up and was quickly attended by the medics.

 

Rock On Ruby led around the far turn and into the final straight from Oscar Whisky, Thousand Stars and Third Intention; the latter soon outpaced.  Oscar Whisky challenged two out, Thousand Stars switching to the outside after the flight.  Barry Geraghty’s mount led before the last, edging slightly left on the run-in.  Towards the line the grey began to stay on well, gradually gaining but was held by a neck at the post.  This season’s Champion Hurdler, Rock On Ruby, finished 3rd, with Third Intention back in 4th.

 

Result

Horse

Jockey

Trainer

1st

Oscar Whisky

Barry Geraghty

Nicky Henderson

2nd

Thousand Stars

Paul Townend

Willie Mullins

3rd

Rock On Ruby

Noel Fehily

Paul Nicholls

4th

Third Intention

Joe Tizzard

Colin Tizzard

 

Despite being driven back to the area across from the stands in a service car and then walking back to the Weighing Room under his own steam, Ruby was stood down for the remainder of the day having suffered a blow to the head when Zarkandar fell.  It was a strange coincidence, as Ruby had been ruled out of the 2010 Grand National having taken a fall in the same race, on that occasion from Celestial Halo.  That year he’d sustained a broken arm when lying on the ground as a result of a kick from Won In The Dark.  

 

I remained in my vantage point on the top step of the Earl of Derby Terrace.

 

It was now time for the race prior to the Grand National, a 3 miles 1 furlong Listed Handicap Chase.  With Ruby being unable to ride for the rest of the day, Paddy Brennan took the mount aboard Chapoturgeon.

 

The starting gate for this race was at the far end of the home straight, with that and two full circuits to travel. 

 

Race 4

Handicap Chase (Listed)

Distance

3 miles 1 furlong (19 fences to negotiate)

No. of Runners

14

 

Then they were off; first time.  The field was led away by the visor wearing Ballyvesey; at the rear were Chapoturgeon and The Hollinwell.  Ballyvesey and Saint Are disputed the lead over the second; On Borrowed Wings and the cheek-pieced Tullamore Dew bumped in mid-air here. 

 

Heading for the third, the order at the head of affairs was Ballyvesey, from My Boy Paddy, Cannington Brook, Saint Are and Carrickboy.  Tullamore Dew came to dispute the lead with Ballyvesey over the 5th fence; Marufo did not get very high when clearing it and further back in the field Ackertac hit the fence, stumbling on landing.  Marufo was low again at the 7th.

 

Into the home straight once more, Ballyvesey led from Tullamore Dew; My Boy Paddy now one from the back having lost his place.  The Hollinwell still in rear.  Little change in the order passing the lollipop with one circuit to go.  Ballyvesey holding the advantage from Tullamore Dew, Marufo, Cannington Brook and Saint Are.  The runners headed out into the country for the final time.

 

Tullamore Dew took a narrow advantage at the 13th fence, however he made an error at the next, the open-ditch, reaching to get to the other side and soon dropped to the back of the leading pack.  Marufo now held the lead, from Ballyvesey, Battle Group, Cannington Brook and Saint Are.  Chapoturgeon had made progress into 6th.

 

Turning into the home straight with just three fences still to negotiate, Marufo held the advantage from Saint Are, Ballyvesey, Cannington Brook, Battle Group and Chapoturgeon.  Approaching two out, Battle Group challenged to the leader’s inside, Saint Are to his outside, these two going on.

 

Saint Are was just ahead over the open-ditch, he then hung across to the far rail, Battle Group renewing his challenge to the nearside.  The latter was almost upsides clearing the last and jumped it with more momentum to get his head in front.  However, Saint Are was not to be denied and battled back to win by half a length at the line.  Chapoturgeon was 16 lengths back in 3rd, Marufo 1½ lengths away in 4th.

 

Result

Horse

Jockey

Trainer

1st

Saint Are

Dougie Costello

Tim Vaughan

2nd

Battle Group

Tom Scudamore

David Pipe

3rd

Chapoturgeon

Paddy Brennan

Paul Nicholls

4th

Marufo

Richard Johnson

Philip Hobbs

 

Third placed Chapoturgeon was led into the covered unsaddling enclosure instead of returning to the Winners’ Enclosure.  This was a precaution following the horse’s distressed state after finishing second in the Cheltenham Foxhunters’ event. 

 

I remained in my vantage point on the top step of the Earl of Derby Terrace ahead of the feature race of the day.

 

*    *    *    *    *    *    *

 

As my diary for Grand National Day is rather large, I decided to split it into two sections; click below to read the remainder:

 

 

GRAND NATIONAL DIARY PART II

 

Click here for photos – The Grand National

Click here for photos – Parade of Champions, Legends Charity Race & Races 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 & 7

 

 

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